Is Tai Chi for you?

In order to help get more movement in my recovering broken shoulder and arm, I had my first Tai Chi lesson a week ago.

I got lost and turned up 5 minutes late. I saw a teacher facing people standing perfectly still and listening to him. This went on for another 5 minutes and the teacher called me as he could see me through the glass door. He asked if I would like to join them and I briefly explained about my shoulder and jumped right in after taking off my coat. There was just one movement I couldn’t manage which involved hanging the right arm out at shoulder level with the wrist facing down. He said if I imagine doing it with my eyes closed, eventually the body will follow. Hey ho.

I wore my double air Nike trainers, whereas plimsolls would probably be more suitable for the foot swivels, so as not to damage knees.

Been there, got the
http://www.cafepress.co.uk/+tai-chi+t-shirts?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=msn&utm_campaign=41462797-d-c&utm_content=1112833999-adid-2017602371&utm_term=kwd-18485348785

I don’t feel I can do my physio today as my poor arm has been through a lot the last couple of days. I definitely hope to go to more Tai Chi. My knee hurt a little, but hopefully, it will strengthen the muscles around the knee. Normally after exercise I feel exhausted, but I caught sight of my eyes in the toilet mirror and they were all sparkly. I felt invigorated.

Yesterday, I returned for my second lesson. It involved the same moves plus breathing techniques but best of all balancing on one leg and walking properly to make falls less likely. I feel it’s helping to make my shoulder more flexible. Some people felt incredibly hot after the session and I must say it’s incredibly relaxing. I don’t suppose it is for everybody as it is somewhat slow, but in my opinion a good way to get fit after an illness or accident.

Activities for the Over Sixties

 

Gone are the days when people over 60 sat in a rocking chair and relaxed all day.  I’m a member of a local charity offering all types of classes, amongst which are

Arts and crafts, drama, jewellery making, music lessons, pottery, needlework groups, singing for all, English literature, book club, history of art, current affairs, genealogy group, reminiscence, Hollywood histories, philosophy, cooking and healthy eating, steady and stable, healthy lungs, beginners computing, social networking, online shopping, Skype workshops, iPads,  belly dancing, badminton, ballroom and Latin dance, chair exercise, chi gong, cycling safety, t’ai chi, gardening, table tennis, Pilates and water splash.  There is also acupressure, shiatsu, massage, beauty therapy, osteopathy, reiki, reflexology and aromatherapy.

Languages to learn are French, Spanish, Russian and lip reading.

Also on offer are coffee mornings, discussion groups, quizzes, lunch clubs, movie night, scrabble and bridge.

Who could be bored or lonely I ask?  There’s a supportive programme of activities for unpaid carers.